Artículo

The Political Geographies of Migration: The Borders, from Static Lines to Mobile Entities

Romero, Mónica

Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, UNAM, publicado en Tlalli. Revista de Investigación en Geografía, y cosechado de Revistas UNAM

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Procedencia del contenido

Cita

Romero, Mónica (2020). The Political Geographies of Migration: The Borders, from Static Lines to Mobile Entities. Tlalli. Revista de Investigación en Geografía; Núm. 3, 2020; 8-19. Recuperado de https://repositorio.unam.mx/contenidos/4109911

Descripción del recurso

Autor(es)
Romero, Mónica
Adscripción del autor
Wilfrid Laurier University
Tipo
Artículo de Investigación
Área del conocimiento
Ciencias Sociales y Económicas
Título
The Political Geographies of Migration: The Borders, from Static Lines to Mobile Entities
Fecha
2020-08-11
Resumen
The article explores the border literature in political geography in order to understand thecontemporary proliferation of bordering practices in the Western world. It takes the caseof President Trump administration’s policies to show how borders can be concealed insocial and political practices inside of sovereign territory. This expansion of geographicalborders continually shapes the sociospatial identities of migrants. The text also analyzeswhy the traditional bordering practice of building border walls is still an appealing re-source aiming at keeping immigrants away from Western territories, even after the prom-ise of a “borderless world” in the late 20th century. This article argues that the expansionof border walls is explained by the analysis of three factors: the transformations on therefugee protection framework after the 90s, the change in states’ perception of refugeesas a threat to Western societies, and the fear of states to be perceived as actors non-capa-ble to maintain their sovereignty. These contemporary practices are consistent with recentdebates in border theory that see the border as a mobile entity instead of a static territo-rial line separating two units of land. This article aims at fostering the idea of borderstudies as a way to unveil new forms of power and control. It also pretends to foster anunderstanding of the interconnectedness of border practices around the world.
Tema
Borders; Border Walls; Migration; Political Geography; U.S. Immigration
Idioma
eng
ISSN
2683-2275

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